One of The Most Important Pieces to Personal Training (Whether you have ADHD or not)

A lot has been added to the field of exercise science over the past few decades. New discoveries of how the body works – whether physical, neurological, or chemical – have led to a multitude of ways to train the body. The more we learn about how it functions, and the more science we apply to training, we can really tune in to what works best on an individual basis.

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I have been a fitness professional for over 16 years now, and have trained hundreds of people during that time. I’ve led private coaching sessions, small groups, boot camps, Muscle Activation Technique (MAT) sessions, lectures, nutrition classes, bodybuilding posing training, online training, and more. A lot of education has gone into learning about the inner workings of the human body and how it is designed to function. And now more research is illustrating the role of exercise in helping to enhance the ADHD mind (more about the specifics of that in another post).

With all of the advanced tools, programs and techniques that have been introduced to improve the human body’s performance, there is still one thing that is so important when it comes to personal training and our role in creating a healthy body:

ACCOUNTABILITY

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In all of the advances with science and it’s role in the personal training industry, just keeping people accountable seems to have become secondary to collecting data, aquiring vast amounts of knowledge, and using the latest scientific research to create the ultimate workout.

The longer that I am in this field, the more I see the importance of keeping others accountable with their health & fitness endeavors. That is a big part of why I have a career. Setting up appointments so that others can stay accountable should be at the top of the list when deciding to utilize a personal trainer. This is especially true with those who have ADHD.

As Marla Cummins states, “Of all the structures, asking for accountability to help you implement a rule is the one that may really rub you the wrong way.” That’s because we don’t necessarily want people telling us what to do, checking in on us, or keeping our feet to the fire. But why not? We have a hard enough time doing it ourselves.

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I own my own fitness facility, so I am there most days of the week. I have to schedule my exercise appointments or they won’t happen…and I am right there! Not to say that you need to be in a gym – many people do well exercising at home, in the park, or just outside somewhere. But being accountable to a partner, friend or fitness professional can be just the thing we need to make strides in continuing to live a healthy and productive life.

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A different view on injuries…

…or in this case, muscle strains.

My previous post explained how I went a little too far with my workout while on vacation, and my body let me know about. I have had a moderate muscle strain on the right side of my mid-back since last Wednesday, and have been dealing with it throughout my travels back home.

Think 3 days in the car and staying in hotels. Ouch.

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Needless to say, I am still feeling the injury although it has subsided over the past couple of days. And though the pain still lingers, I feel it is not as bad as it could have been or would still be today. Why?

One of the main reasons, I believe, is because I took a different view of the injury when it happened. When the pain first started coming on, I could have thought “Oh crap. This is going to ruin my whole vacation and I am going to be hurting bad.”

But I didn’t. I made sure to keep myself aware of what had happened, why it may have happened, and what my view was going to be from that point on. The ADHD mind can certainly obsess on things, so it is important to have a healthy viewpoint when looking at a situation.

So I started to take steps to help the healing process as soon as I could, first of which was don’t be in positions that hurt the area. Pain is a signal – like a check engine light – that says something is wrong, and here is the signal to tell you that. If I had positions I could sit in, lay down in, or stand in that didn’t hurt, then that’s where I would be. It almost seems too easy or that it’s just common sense.

It is, and sometimes we just need to listen to our intuitions – if it hurts, don’t do it.

I also made sure to change my view from all of the negatives associated with injuries to have a positive outlook during the healing process. I began to think about some of the benefits that occur with injuries:

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1) an increased awareness of the body. It will let one know when they have moved too far, bent too low, or twisted too much. The injury can signal the body’s current (and hopefully temporary) limits.

2) moving slower. The physical act of moving slower allows for not taking things at such a frantic pace.

3) deeper breathing. If not too painful, breathing deeper can allow for faster healing by expanding the rib cage (keeping up movement) and sending more oxygen and blood flow to the injured area.

4) better posture. Isn’t it amazing that many times when we have tweaked a muscle, our posture automatically becomes better? Suddenly we stand straight up and seem taller. It’s like the body knows what position it is supposed to be in and goes to it.

Really I just made sure to have a different mindset towards the injury, and that could make all of the difference towards feeling better faster. I know the injury is still there and will not ignore the situation by pushing through mindlessly – but why not focus on the positives instead of dwelling on the negatives? At least I have a choice, right?

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That is how I choose to view this situation, and that alone helps me feel better – both physically ano mentally.